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February 2016

Transform Your Business Through More Effective Personal Reviews

What do you make of this chart that I came across this week?

Employee Profile Organisational

Before you spend too much time on the question, let me confess that it is not entirely a fair one, for this is a summary of that chart. The original was entitled “Employee Career Profile” and included definitions in each quadrants that made it too busy to include here. Thus to answer you need to know what those definitions were. So, going clockwise, they are:

  • Traditionally Loyal are company oriented employees who promote the company but are dissatisfied with or don’t care about the work they’re doing. This may impact on their performance. These employees may be happier and more committed in another position.
  • Truly Dedicated Ambassadors are employees who speak well of the company and are enthusiastic about their work. These employees are assets, and managers should use them, and their departments as models for others.
  • Strivers are career oriented employees who are more focused on their career development. They may be highly productive, but are also at risk of being head hunted. Managers should explore ways to increase company commitment.
  • Disconnected are employees who are not enthusiastic about their work or the company they work for. In the extreme, disconnected employees can cause dissent in the workplace. Managers should find and fix issues resulting in low commitment.

The fact that I altered the title may in any case colour your answer. My change implies both that I don’t altogether agree with it and the reason why. Apart from the implication that only ambassadors are assets, for me it epitomises the inherent flaw of nearly all HR and OD initiatives: it starts from the organisational perspective.  After all, how can you look at an employee’s career profile without addressing the employee’s personal aims and aspirations?  

Realistically assessing an employee essentially entails reviewing two personal attributes, as my chart below shows.

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Beware WIIFM: Avoid Its Present Dangers

WIIFM 1Virtually unheard of ten years ago, WIIFM – the acronym for What’s In It For Me – has become a surprisingly popular term in business. Originally coined to focus marketing efforts on customer needs, it has become a key concept in change management and HR. Here, however, it is a double-edged sword and needs to be invoked with care.

On the positive side, WIIFM recognises the individual and looks to address personal needs and expectations. A shift away from traditional command and control thinking, with its philosophy that the employee is simply a resource required to do what they are told, this is clearly progress.  

Unfortunately, it also has three inherent dangers that are not widely recognised.

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Transforming Human Resources

You likely heard the news late last week that the Shell share price rose 7% in response to the news that the company was cutting 10,000 jobs. So, what was your reaction?

I wager it hardly made any impression on you. Yet that report encapsulates the pervasive attitude that people are simply a resource, and reinforces my case that the HR profession needs to change its approach. Let’s take a look how it could go about this.

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Turning “Human Resources” into “Humane Resources”

Shaking hands 878566_s 123RFLast week I wrote about the strange dichotomy in organisations: their dependency on people while generally failing to take any account of the intrinsic drivers of human behaviour. I attributed this to a large extent to an ingrained management attitude of considering people as job-fillers and numbers. While holding to that view, I now want to consider the extent to which the HR profession has been guilty of perpetuating this pervasive attitude.

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