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September 2015

A simple solution for transforming a ‘dire workplace’

Do you work in a dire workplace? The odds are that you do. At least according to Jeffrey Pfeffer, Professor of Organizational Behaviour at the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University. In an article entitled "Why we don't get the leaders we say we want” he proclaims, “The state of workplaces, not just in the U.S. but all over the world, can only be described as dire.”

Pfeffer justifies his claim by citing that, whatever research data you choose to follow, “The picture that emerges is consistent: mostly disengaged, dissatisfied, disaffected employees. Moreover, there is no evidence that things are getting better over time.” I am sure you also find this discouraging, even depressing.  After all, it is tough to get up and go to work each day when you feel your workplace is “dire.”  It make no difference whether you are at the lowest level of the organisation or the leader trying desperately trying to change the culture: the feeling is the same.

If, however, you are the leader, you will find scant comfort in the blame that Pfeffer attributes to leaders, or his testimony that “about one half of all leaders are failures in their roles,” and that there is not a scintilla of evidence that more people in leadership roles are adhering to the many prescriptions offered.” The only relief you might find could lie in his explanations for this.

Far be it for me to say that leaders need to be better qualified, but I think there is undeniable merit in his case about the other two causes. Indeed I have myself previously written about how our preoccupation with measures. This is so strong that it has virtually come to be an obsession. Thus while Pfeffer is not wrong in identifying “bad measures” as one of the causes, what I think he has missed, is the relationship between bad measures and the not getting the leadership we say we want. He fails to adequately identify the fact that is the obsession with the bad measures that govern behaviour and that therefore prevents leaders from manifesting the qualities we say we are expecting. The truth is, those qualities still come second to “meeting the numbers.”

This means that there is nothing compelling leaders to adopt or consistently demonstrate the qualities being called for. We are actually placing our leaders in an untenable position where they can never embrace and consistently manifest them because they “have two masters.” This all boils down to what I have called “The Great Management Paradox:” the convention of calling people assets but persisting in accounting for, managing them and treating them purely as costs.

As I have written before, “A leader is someone who inspires people to want the same thing that they want.”  The only way you can consistently do this within an organisation, is to make the employees owners with a stake in in its results. And, in order to do this effectively, you have to stop treating people as an expendable resource and demonstrate that they have a value and that value rises and falls according to the contribution they make to the organisation. And I still have not encountered anything delivers both of these requirements, as my ‘Every Individual Matters’ model does.

From dire to engaged

So, if you truly want to be an effective leader, you should contact me now to find out more.  

Bay Jordan

Bay is the founder and director of Zealise, and the creator of the ‘Every Individual Matters’ organisational culture model that helps transform organisational performance and bottom-line results. Bay is also the author of several books, including “Lean Organisations Need FAT People” and “The 7 Deadly Toxins of Employee Engagement.”


A misguided idea of leadership: could this be the ultimate leadership mistake?

“Imagine for a minute, a workplace where everyone is aligned with business objectives; where everyone understands the value they contribute; an environment where people actively seek to build mutually beneficial relationships across the organization.”  This invocative opening statement to a newsletter caught my attention because that is precisely the type of workplace that I aspire to help create - and would like to see as universal.  But the next sentence struck me like a blow to the solar plexus.

Continue reading "A misguided idea of leadership: could this be the ultimate leadership mistake?" »